The chemical encroachment into our public water supply is ramping up as scientists are now suggesting infusing it with another bioactive substance.

After Japanese researchers found that suicide rates were lower in areas with higher amounts of naturally-occurring lithium in the water, the conclusion seemed obvious: more lithium equals fewer suicides.


Given the country’s serious suicide problem, Japan’s public began urging officials to use lithium as a chemical weapon against suicide.

According to Natural News:

“Lithium is a naturally occurring chemical element that, at high doses, is used for the treatment of bipolar disorder and severe depression. Side effects of lithium use at these doses include hypothyroidism, weight gain and kidney failure.”


However, putting aside the ethical concerns for a moment, conclusive data has been far from acquired.

In fact, researchers from Scotland decided to replicate the Japanese study and mend some of its methodological weaknesses—implying far more research must be conducted before blasting chemicals into our water.


“We want to improve the methodology by looking at smaller postcode areas,” said Daniel Smith, the team’s lead researcher.

Despite the ambiguity, prior studies from as early as 1990 found similar results within the United States.

Performed on 27 Texas counties, the lithium link was also found, with suicide rates—and even homicide/rape rates—sometimes as much as 40% lower where the chemical existed in higher amounts.

Even without conclusive causal evidence, though, numerous publications, researchers, and psychiatrists have called for a forced-infusion of lithium into public water.

Even the New York Times, in an editorial by the Weill Cornel Medical College, the debate was described as “moot.”

“Mother Nature has already put a psychotropic drug in the drinking water, and that drug is lithium,” reads the piece.

The underlying debate, however, inevitably treads into ethics, with many activists saying such practices would violate citizens’ rights.

The opposition, though, is not convinced.

“If low-dose lithium proves as good as its promise, we should not allow abstract arguments about our ‘freedom’ to drink unadulterated water to prevent us from undertaking a mass fortification effort,” wrote Jacob M. Appel, a bioethicist, for the Huffington Post.

“Some nay-sayers will inevitably argue that medically fortifying the public water is a violation of individual liberty,” he added, “Of course, nobody is forcing those dissident individuals to drink tap water. They are welcome to purchase bottled water.”


Given the corrupt collusion practices of Big Pharma and Big Government, it’s not a stretch to say that putting literal “mind-bending” powers into the hands of our leaders is….unsafe, to say the least.

This isn’t new news. Learn more in the video below:


Sources:
Natural News
New York Times
Huffington Post
Via: David Wolfe;

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